Blood and lymph flow

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Picture: The lymph system is extremely sensitive to pressure. That is why we, e.g., change position 25–50 times during sleep. There are immune (“killer”) cells in the lymph nodes to eliminate all hostile pathogens and to collect the lymph liquid and move all waste into the vein circulation. Good posture, movement, loose clothing, and relaxed muscles are needed for healthy lymph flow. Saddle seating is truly beneficial in activating the lymphatic system. 

Original source of picture: Paulsen, Waschke, Sobotta Atlas of Human Anatomy, 15th Edition 2011©Elsevier GmbH, Urban & Fischer, Munich.

There is lymph liquid and 4–6 litres of blood in the human body, the lymph being filtered in 600 –700 lymph nodes. All liquid is moving through 400.000–500.000 km of vessels, 7.000 km in each kg of soft tissues. Only one litre of the blood is moving because of the pumping pressure of the heart. The rest of the liquids move because of the motions and activity of the muscles and other soft tissues.

Our conventional and modern habits of slouched sitting, tight clothing, poor nutrition and physical inactivity greatly disturb these sensitive systems. This results in various health problems and discomfort. The sensitivity of the circulation can be demonstrated by closing a vein on the back of the hand by pressing it ever so slightly with a finger. This illustrates in a small scale how dramatically the circulation must be disturbed because of our circulation-hostile lifestyle.

Lymph node.jpgUsing a two-part saddle chair will significantly reduce the pressure on the soft tissues in the pelvic area, keep the clothes looser, widen the angles of the limbs and activate muscle function, thus activating circulation and the lymphatic system. The effect is most powerful in the typical pressure areas (caused by conventional office chairs), such as thighs, buttocks, genital area, back and lower limbs. Blood circulation speeds up also in the typical tension areas, such as the upper back.

Lower limbs benefit from the riding-like sitting too, since the hip and knee angles become wider, making it easier to use the legs and enabling the so called "muscle pump” to work properly. Sitting bones carry most of the body weight, which in turn eases the pressure on the thighs and buttocks. For example, the Gluteus Maximus muscle remains safely outside the pressure area.

 A smart sitter also uses loose trousers or skirt, and underwear that are not too tight. The most beneficial alternative for the circulation would be to use loose-fitting clothes that do not press the waist.

 

Abb_4_153_pur_150.jpgThe large femoral vessels in front the pelvis get pressed in the groin by muscles and fat when sitting in 90/90 degree angle, and also because of the tightness of the trousers in that position. The lymphatic vessels are pressed and disturbed as well. This can be avoided with the 135 degree angle of saddle sitting.

Original source of picture: Paulsen, Waschke, Sobotta Atlas of Human Anatomy, 15th Edition 2011©Elsevier GmbH, Urban & Fischer, Munich.

 

 Abb_4_160_pur_150.jpgThe gluteal vessels, together with the lymph vessels, are severely pressed as long as the sitting continues on a traditional seat. The ischiatic nerve, gluteal artery, and the vein deeper under the muscles get pressed unavoidably causing weakening circulation on the back side of the legs. This causes, e.g., varicose veins and other problems. Good sitting position, loose clothes around the pelvis, and well-designed seats put the pressure on the sitting bones, away from the buttock muscles, allowing circulation to flow.

Original source of picture: Paulsen, Waschke, Sobotta Atlas of Human Anatomy, 15th Edition 2011©Elsevier GmbH, Urban & Fischer, Munich.