Shoulder joints and mouse-hand syndrome

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Shoulder joint problems are common in professions where the angle between the upper body and the upper arm is more than 30 degrees, for example, in dentistry. When using a saddle chair, the angle usually stays smaller than 30 degrees and helps to prevent shoulder joint problems.

The detrimental, sharp angle of the wrist, repetitious movements and muscle tensions, together with pinched nerves in the shoulder area, cause most mouse-hand problems. Relieving pressure from the neck and shoulder area, and finding the correct place for the shoulder while sitting in a good posture, also helps in getting rid of the mouse-hand problems. Good posture and good hand support with almost straight wrists prevents the problem.